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What Is A Tankless Water Heater

A tankless HWS runs on gas or electricity. A sensor within the system will pick up when a hot water tap is turned on and release gas to ignite and heat the water for consumption.

Which is better – Hot water heater or tankless?

In general a tankless system is more energy efficient than a storage system. Because in a storage system the hot water heated will lose heat during the day. This will need to be reheated and will cost more.

What is the purpose of a tankless hot water heater?

A tankless system purpose is to supply water the instant the user in the household needs hot water. Fuel consumption is less as the system does not run 24 hours a day.

What is the difference between point of use and tankless water heaters?

A point of use system is located near the point where the water is going to be used. Unlike the system which supplies water to the entire house.

How much does it cost to run a tankless hot water heater?

The tankless hot water heater installation cost range between $750 to $3000 if switching between electric to gas. A normal system costs between $500 to $1000.

Tankless systems require a lot of energy to heat up water immediately. However it doesnt run all the time so energy saving happens. It costs roughly $527.10 per year for a family of four.

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Three Types of Hot Water Systems

Three Types of Hot Water Systems

A HWS or hot water system is a boiler that heats water up. It is typically a boiler in which water is stored and heated for washing and bathing. The temperature is heated to around 60 to 83 degree Celsius and then

Types of HWS

There are two main types of HWS. These are:

  • Storage systems – water is stored in a large tank until needed
  • Continuoud flow system – known as instantaneous systems. Produces hot water when its needed.

These are broken down into 4 hot water systems:

  1. Electric Hot water Systems
  2. Solar HWS
  3. Gas HWS
  4. Heat Pump Water Heater

What is the most efficient way to heat house water

The electric heat water system is the most efficient way to heat water and is very cost effective. Save money.

How many years will a HWS last

The HWS usually last for many years. A continuous flow gas powered system can last 15 to 20 years with proper maintenance. Electric systems usually last 8 to 10 years and this will depend if its a tank system or tankless. The hot water system warranty is a good gauge of how long the system is made to last.

PS: a tankless hot water system is gas fueled HWS. When you open the hot water tap a sensor picks up that you need hot water and then the gas starts burning to heat water instantaneously, warming the water for immediate use.

Do HWS use a lot of electricity

Hot water systems usually take up 30% of the electricity bill for a home. The reason being the system is run 24/7. The interesting thing is people only use the showers early morning and in the evening, yet the system is run 24 hours a day wasting electricity.

Are there any disadvantages of hot water system

The main disadvantage is the cost of installing the system. It is a big investment and needs a licensed plumber to install. Running the system daily is expensive as well. Water heating is approximately 21 to 25% of the energy used in a home.

How to choose a hot water system

Here are 4 tips to keep in mind when buying a HWS:

  • Fuel type, availability and cost. The type of fuel you will use will not only affect the annual cost to run, but also its size and energy efficiency
  • Size – large enough to provide the entire house hold with ample hot water for showers
  • Energy efficiency – To maxi mise energy and cost savings
  • Costs – Before purchasing a HWS make sure you calculate how much it costs to run annually and compare the costs with other less or more energy efficient systems on the market.

Is hot water cheaper from gas or electricity

Gas heaters cost approximately the same as electric HWS. However the cost of gas is far cheaper than electricity. This will give you better savings if you go for a gas hot water system.

Call Plumbaround plumbers to help you install a new system on your premises.

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What is a sewage drain Pipe

What is a sewage drain Pipe

Sewage drains is a network of pipes that are underground that takes away the human waste, waste waste, excrement, waste water and surface water run-off, from drains to water treatment facilities or disposal units ruin by the council.

3 things You Should Know About Sewage Pipes

  • Difference between drains and sewers: Both are waste water pipes. The main difference is the positioning of these pipes. The pipes on a residential or commercial property is the drainage system. Once it connects with the council waste water system its called the sewage system.
  • Drainage sewage pipes: There are 3 types. The first carries rainwater to rivers. The second carries the waste water to treatment facilities. The third carries is where the pipes carries both stormwater and waste water is both released into the environment because the sewage treatment plant has reached capacity.
  • Types of drain pipes: The most common used pipe is PVC or polyvinyl Chloride. The second type of pipe is galvanized pipes

What is the difference between a sewer drain and a drain?

When discussing the differences between a sewer drain and a drain, it’s important to understand the distinct roles they play in plumbing and water management systems.

A sewer drain, often referred to as a sewer line, is a major component of a city or municipality’s wastewater disposal system. It is a large pipe that transports sewage and wastewater from residential and commercial buildings to a sewage treatment plant. Sewer drains are designed to handle all types of waste, including human waste, water from sinks and showers, and sometimes stormwater. These are typically located underground and are maintained by local government or utility companies.

On the other hand, a drain is a more general term and can refer to any conduit through which liquids are removed. Drains are found in various contexts, from the small ones in household sinks and showers to larger storm drains on streets. These drains are designed to carry away water and, in some cases, small waste particles. Unlike sewer drains, they are not specifically meant for sewage transport. Household drains usually connect to a sewer system or a septic tank, while street drains might lead to water treatment facilities or natural bodies of water.

The key differences lie in their function and scale. Sewer drains are part of a larger system focused on sanitation and public health, managing all kinds of wastewater, while drains can be part of various systems, often dealing only with water removal. Understanding these differences is crucial for proper maintenance and troubleshooting in plumbing and water management.

How Do I Identify a Sewer Drain?

When discussing the differences between a sewer drain and a drain, it’s important to understand the distinct roles they play in plumbing and water management systems.

A sewer drain, often referred to as a sewer line, is a major component of a city or municipality’s wastewater disposal system. It is a large pipe that transports sewage and wastewater from residential and commercial buildings to a sewage treatment plant. Sewer drains are designed to handle all types of waste, including human waste, water from sinks and showers, and sometimes stormwater. These are typically located underground and are maintained by local government or utility companies.

On the other hand, a drain is a more general term and can refer to any conduit through which liquids are removed. Drains are found in various contexts, from the small ones in household sinks and showers to larger storm drains on streets. These drains are designed to carry away water and, in some cases, small waste particles. Unlike sewer drains, they are not specifically meant for sewage transport. Household drains usually connect to a sewer system or a septic tank, while street drains might lead to water treatment facilities or natural bodies of water.

The key differences lie in their function and scale. Sewer drains are part of a larger system focused on sanitation and public health, managing all kinds of wastewater, while drains can be part of various systems, often dealing only with water removal. Understanding these differences is crucial for proper maintenance and troubleshooting in plumbing and water management.

What Is The Difference Between a Sewer and Storm water Drain?

Sewer and stormwater drains are two crucial components of urban infrastructure, serving distinct yet essential purposes in managing water in our environments. Sewers, also known as sanitary sewers, are designed for transporting sewage – a mix of waste water from homes, businesses, and industrial sources. This wastewater typically includes everything from household waste, such as toilet flushes and shower water, to industrial effluents. The main goal of a sewer system is to convey this waste to treatment facilities where it can be processed, treated, and eventually discharged safely back into the environment or reused.

In contrast, stormwater drains, also referred to as storm sewers, are designed exclusively for managing rainwater run-off. During periods of rainfall or snowmelt, stormwater drains collect water from streets, rooftops, and other impermeable surfaces and channel it away from urban areas to prevent flooding. This water is often directed to local water bodies like rivers, lakes, or oceans and is typically not treated, which is why managing pollution on surfaces is critical to prevent contaminants from entering these ecosystems.

The key differences between these two systems lie in their purpose and the type of water they handle. Sewer systems focus on sanitation and public health by treating wastewater before releasing it, while stormwater systems are geared towards flood prevention and managing rainwater run-off. Mixing these two systems can lead to environmental hazards, such as the overloading of sewage treatment plants during heavy rains, resulting in the potential release of untreated sewage into the environment. Thus, understanding and maintaining the distinction between these two systems is vital for effective water management and environmental protection.

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Three Types of Hot Water Systems

What Causes A Blocked Storm Water Drain

Storm water is water that happens when a storm occurs. This is the surface water that happens in a downpour. This can be a major problem when a large body of water has to be gotten rid off. Storm water can accumulate in yards and make the ground soggy. Its best to get a licensed plumber to install stormwater drains to take the surplus water away.

What is a storm water drain?

A stormwater drain a a system of drainage that is installed to take away the excess water that falls during a downpour.

What is the purpose of storm water drains

The purpose of storm water drains is to take away the rain water that is on the surface of car parks, concrete yards and backyards of industrial and residential sites away from the property so that no water damage occurs with water accumulating and entering the property.

Where do storm water drains lead to

Stormwater drains drain into a point-of-discharge. These are found alongside kerb, under concrete slabs which has water channels underneath to take the water away in large underground stormwater pipes. These stormwater pipes connect to council drainage systems.

Is storm water drains same as drainage

Most storm water ends up in small bodies of water such as ponds, lakes or creeks. They may also end up in the closest water source nearby as well. Eventually the stormwater ends up in rivers, and oceans.

Who is responsible for storm water drains

In Queensland stormwater drains on properties are the responsibility of the property owners to the point where it connects with the council drains. The council will maintain the drains outside your property.

Please note you cannot connect your stormwater drain to the sewage drainage system or re-direct it to the neighbor’s yard.

What is the difference between storm water drains and sewer drainage

Stormwater is different from sewage. Sewage is the water waste waste from households and is treated at water treatment facilities. However, storm water is not treated and is discharged into large bodies of water such as lakes and rivers.

Types of storm water drainage systems

The different types of stormwater drains are:

  • Slot drains
  • Open stormwater drains
  • Closed stormwater drains
  • French drains
  • Permeable pavement

How to divert stormwater runoff

To divert stormwater you will need to install an aggi pipe, gravel pit, water proofing and a pump out system that will alleviate any excess surface water that is not dealt with by the main storm water

How to solve stormwater drainage problems?

Here are 5 ways to prevent a storm water problem occurring:

  1. Keep drainage points clear of debris
  2. Check downpipes and gutters for any leaves that may block the stormwater pipes
  3. Flush out pipes before storm season
  4. Use a water jet to clear debris
  5. Install gutter guards, leaf diverters over drainage

How to unclog a stormwater drain

Here are some tips on how to unclog a stormwater drain:

  • Use a classic plunger by forcing air down the pipe to flush the debris out
  • Drain Auger method: Hire a drain auger to remove roots or anything blocking the drain
  • The sue of chemical

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What Is Meant By Backflow of Water

What Is Meant By Backflow of Water

How Do You Explain What Backflow Is!

In plumbing the term backflow is used when water flow in the reverse direction. This can lead to severe health risk as the backflow water could contaminate drinking water supplies as well as the foul smells can harm the residents of the home.

What Causes The Water To Backflow?

When there is an unbalance in water pressure between the main and the internal system of the home or business. When the water delivery main has lower water pressure to that of the internal plumbing system then back siphonage occurs. This is also called reverse water flow by some people.

WHAT ARE THE TYPES OF BACKFLOW

There are two types of backflow:

  • Back pressure backflow: this is caused when the downstream pressure is far greater than the upstream pressure (from the public water system). Downstream water pressure is caused by pumps, boiler temperatures. Potable water pressure occurs when the amount of water used exceeds to the supply.
  • Back siphonage: This is caused by negative water pressure (a vacuum or partial vacuum) in public water system. This resembles drinking water through a straw. This normally occurs when water supply is topped when fire fighting or break in the main occurs.

How to stop backflow

Here are 5 ways you can stop backflow:

  1. Air gaps: By installing air gaps you can prevent water flowing back into the dispensing system. These air gaps are normally used in toilets and faucets, separating home supply lines from the sewage lines.
  2. Atmosphere vacuum breakers; Used by home owners who want to install a single backflow to prevent a threat from the public water system. This is cost effective and easily maintained.
  3. Pressure vacuum breakers: This is a more sophisticated version of Atmosphere vacuum breakers. Instead of using air pressure to separate the two systems it generates its own pressure. This is more effective and has wider usage. There is a downside. It needs annual testing which cost money.
  4. Check values: These values come as single and double values for less or more hazardous contamination respectively. These are underground installations. Though these check values are effective they don’t filter out hazardous chemicals. Hence they cant be used in industrial buildings.These also need annual testing.
  5. Reduced pressure principle assemblies: This is the most sophisticated prevention backflow systems available. This makes them available to both home owners and commercial, industrial properties that are exposed to significant water hazards. This system used the 2 check values procedure as well as a depressurized zone that prevents water flow back even if the value fails. This system requires annual testing.

To get effective backflow prevention systems installed on your residential or commercial properties you will need a licensed expert plumber . Call Plumbaround to quote on the job.

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Plumbing Maintenance List | Tell Tale Signs When A Plumber Is Needed

Plumbing Maintenance List | Tell Tale Signs When A Plumber Is Needed

When To Call A Plumber

Just like anything these days plumbing too gets tired with use and decay. Knowing when to call a plumber in time to fix your plumbing is crucial if you want to save in expensive repair bills.

It is advisable not to try doing a repair job yourself unless you are a licensed and insured plumber. Any damage to the property may not be covered by insurance. So its best to call a licensed plumber to check the cause of the problem and fix it immediately.

Here is a list of tell tale signs that the plumbing in your home, office or commercial premises may need a good look over by an experienced plumber.

  1. BACK UP IN PIPE WORK: Backup in the pipe and drainage systems on your property. If you are experiencing back-up in your drains or sewage systems regularly then it may be advisable to get a plumber around with his camera to take a look at what is happening inside those pipes. Possibly the pipework may be clogged with debris or tree roots.
  2. POOR WATER QUALITY: This normally comes when pipework is old and rusty. This maybe from old pipes on the property or old and rusting hot water system. Calling a plumber is the best advise we can give you as he will give you a full report of what is happening with the plumbing and a quotation to repair old pipework.
  3. NOISY PIPEWORK: Noisy pipes indicate that the pipework is getting weak and may need to be replaced. Best to call a plumbing contractor in the neighborhood to do a routine check.
  4. BLOCKAGE OR CLOGGING: Your toilet, bathroom basin, tub or kitchen sink may time to time get blocked. It may be simple to use a plunger to get right of the problem and flush everything down the drain. However, if the problem persists please call a plumbing company near you to come over and check the issue with the clogged pipes or basin. Quite often this will help locate the problem sooner and help prevent expensive cleanup bill so repair jobs to carpet, walls due to water overflowing and flooding the home or business.
  5. WATER BUBBLING: Bubbling water sounds after the toilet is flushed normally is a sign that a pipe maybe cracked or faulty. Best to call a plumber to look at this before the damage escalates.
  6. INCREASE IN WATER BILL: This is a clear sign that either the residents of the premises are using too much water or that water maybe leaking from a tap or from a hidden cracked pipe underground. Get a plumber to come in and check this emergency as it will lead to further water bills being too high.
  7. NO OR VERY LOW WATER PRESSURE: When water pressure is almost zero or not present then this may indicate that somewhere in the pipework there is a leaking pipe. Another thing to remember is that if the pressure in the pipework fluctuate daily this too will indicate water pressure is being lost due to a leaking pipe.
  8. WET OR SOGGY LAWN PATCHES: Are you seen your lawn damp and soggy when it hasn’t rained for a while? This may indicate that there is possibly a leaking pipe under the grass and water is leaking out. This will cause your water bill to increase as well as contaminate the water supply entering the home or business pipework systems. Best to call Plumbaround to come by to check what the plumbing problem is. It is important to know that is the water leak in inside your property then its your responsibility. The council will take care of leaks outside your property boundary. You may need to discuss this with your plumber when they come to inspect.
  9. BAD SMELLS: Bad smells coming from drains is a early signal that the sewage system may be clogging up and will need looking at. Call your local licensed plumber with a snake to come and fix this smelly problem.
  10. NO HOT WATER: When the hot water system if not giving you enough hot water supply then its possible you may need the system to be replaced. Get a professional licensed plumber such as Plumbaround to come by and give you a quote to replace the HWS.
  11. DRIPPING TAPS, LEAKING SHOWER HEADS: We all have had leaking taps, dripping shower heads. Most often we ignore this until the water bill arrives and it far exceeds the norm. There are many causes that may lead to the leaks. Some are: poorly installed washer. Damaged or corroded washers, Damaged or loose o-rings, Wear and tear of cartridge, Value seat damage or mineral build-up,Excessive high water pressure, A leaking pipe that has not been diagnosed.
  12. TOILET WON’T STOP RUNNING: This is a silent problem. You probably won’t even hear it. The leaking cistern will cause your water bill to increase each quarter. The issue maybe that the flapper is faulty in the cistern. The flapper is designed to help seal the toilet cistern from the bowl. A faulty or cracked flapper will not seal the cistern, causing water to leak through. Most often this is the water leaking sound you may hear when you pass the toilet each day. You must stop the leak by calling a plumber immediately.
  13. BACKFLOW EMERGENCY: What is a backflow… Backflow is when water backs up in the pipe system and comes back up and overflows into the sink, toilet bowl or bathroom. This potentially can destroy furnishing in kitchen, living spaces, damaging carpet, cupboards, floors and even your furniture. The worse thing is the backflow water brings with it foul smells and germs that can contaminate your drinking water system and be hazardous to your health. This is an emergency that you just need to call your local plumbing contractor called Plumbaround.
  14. WATER ACCUMULATING NEAR BASE OF DISHWASHER OR WASHING MACHINE: Call a plumber to come and check the intake and outtake lines to the equipment.
  15. WATER STAINS UNDER KITCHEN OR BATHROOM CABINETS: This indicates that possible water leaks are happening.
  16. SLOW DRAINING SINKS EVEN AFTER PLUNGING: This normally indicates that there is grim from food waste that maybe stuck along the inside lining of the pipes and not allowing water to flow easily. Its best to call a plumber as he will need to locate where this maybe coming from. Sometimes it could be near the sink itself or possibly hidden in the walls or under the house. The plumber will use a camera to locate the problem and then come up with the solution to fix the blocked pipe. Having a regular maintenance of your property done by a plumber each year maybe the best answer.

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