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Plumbing challenges during the rainy season

Australia’s rainy season is upon us, bringing a few plumbing challenges. In this blog, we’ll explore key issues, offer solutions, delve into average repair costs, and provide essential tips for a hassle-free rainy season.

  • Blocked Drains: With heavy rain, drains can quickly clog with leaves and debris. Keep an eye on slow drainage, and routinely clear outdoor drains. This simple practice can prevent blockages and ensure smooth water flow during downpours. If you notice overflowing drains, you could have a blockage and may need to get the cameras down there and hydrojet out any built-up debris.

  • Overflowing Gutters: Properly functioning gutters are crucial during heavy rains. Clear them of debris regularly to prevent water overflow that can damage your home’s foundation. Extend downspouts to direct water away from the foundation, and consider installing gutter guards to reduce debris buildup. If left unattended, the average cost for overflowing gutter repair is approximately $450. Investing in gutter maintenance not only protects your home but also saves you money in the long run.

  • Sewer Backups: Excessive rain can strain sewer systems, leading to backups. Listen for gurgling sounds in drains and address issues promptly. Regularly schedule professional inspections and consider preventive measures, such as sewer line cleaning. The average cost for sewer backup work ranges from $1000 to $5000, emphasising the importance of proactive maintenance. Understanding your home’s sewer system and acting swiftly can save you from significant disruptions and hefty repair bills.  
  • Leaky Roof Troubles: heavy winds can expose roof leaks, causing potential water damage. Regularly inspect your ceiling for water stains or drips during and after heavy rain. Maintain roof integrity by replacing damaged shingles promptly. The average cost for roof leak repairs varies but can be around $300 to $1500. Timely attention to roof issues not only preserves your home’s interior but also safeguards against more extensive and expensive repairs.

  • Sump Pump Concerns: A reliable sump pump is essential to prevent flooding during heavy rain. Test your pump before the rainy season, ensure proper drainage, and consider a battery backup for power outages. There are two main types of sump pumps: pedestal pumps (average cost $100 – $200) and submersible pumps (average cost $150 – $400). Understanding these costs can help you budget for potential replacements or repairs. Additionally, installing a sump pump alarm alerts you to any malfunctions, providing an extra layer of protection. Properly maintained sump pumps ensure your home stays dry and secure during the rainy season.

Hydrojet away any built-up debris!

As you gear up to face the challenges of the rainy season, remember that a proactive approach can save you from significant plumbing headaches. Regular maintenance, quick responses to issues, and understanding potential costs are key to keeping your home dry and secure. If you ever find yourself in need of professional assistance or want hassle-free solutions to your plumbing concerns, reach out to us at 07 3038 1038.

What is a sewage drain Pipe

What is a sewage drain Pipe

Sewage drains is a network of pipes that are underground that takes away the human waste, waste waste, excrement, waste water and surface water run-off, from drains to water treatment facilities or disposal units ruin by the council.

3 things You Should Know About Sewage Pipes

  • Difference between drains and sewers: Both are waste water pipes. The main difference is the positioning of these pipes. The pipes on a residential or commercial property is the drainage system. Once it connects with the council waste water system its called the sewage system.
  • Drainage sewage pipes: There are 3 types. The first carries rainwater to rivers. The second carries the waste water to treatment facilities. The third carries is where the pipes carries both stormwater and waste water is both released into the environment because the sewage treatment plant has reached capacity.
  • Types of drain pipes: The most common used pipe is PVC or polyvinyl Chloride. The second type of pipe is galvanized pipes

What is the difference between a sewer drain and a drain?

When discussing the differences between a sewer drain and a drain, it’s important to understand the distinct roles they play in plumbing and water management systems.

A sewer drain, often referred to as a sewer line, is a major component of a city or municipality’s wastewater disposal system. It is a large pipe that transports sewage and wastewater from residential and commercial buildings to a sewage treatment plant. Sewer drains are designed to handle all types of waste, including human waste, water from sinks and showers, and sometimes stormwater. These are typically located underground and are maintained by local government or utility companies.

On the other hand, a drain is a more general term and can refer to any conduit through which liquids are removed. Drains are found in various contexts, from the small ones in household sinks and showers to larger storm drains on streets. These drains are designed to carry away water and, in some cases, small waste particles. Unlike sewer drains, they are not specifically meant for sewage transport. Household drains usually connect to a sewer system or a septic tank, while street drains might lead to water treatment facilities or natural bodies of water.

The key differences lie in their function and scale. Sewer drains are part of a larger system focused on sanitation and public health, managing all kinds of wastewater, while drains can be part of various systems, often dealing only with water removal. Understanding these differences is crucial for proper maintenance and troubleshooting in plumbing and water management.

How Do I Identify a Sewer Drain?

When discussing the differences between a sewer drain and a drain, it’s important to understand the distinct roles they play in plumbing and water management systems.

A sewer drain, often referred to as a sewer line, is a major component of a city or municipality’s wastewater disposal system. It is a large pipe that transports sewage and wastewater from residential and commercial buildings to a sewage treatment plant. Sewer drains are designed to handle all types of waste, including human waste, water from sinks and showers, and sometimes stormwater. These are typically located underground and are maintained by local government or utility companies.

On the other hand, a drain is a more general term and can refer to any conduit through which liquids are removed. Drains are found in various contexts, from the small ones in household sinks and showers to larger storm drains on streets. These drains are designed to carry away water and, in some cases, small waste particles. Unlike sewer drains, they are not specifically meant for sewage transport. Household drains usually connect to a sewer system or a septic tank, while street drains might lead to water treatment facilities or natural bodies of water.

The key differences lie in their function and scale. Sewer drains are part of a larger system focused on sanitation and public health, managing all kinds of wastewater, while drains can be part of various systems, often dealing only with water removal. Understanding these differences is crucial for proper maintenance and troubleshooting in plumbing and water management.

What Is The Difference Between a Sewer and Storm water Drain?

Sewer and stormwater drains are two crucial components of urban infrastructure, serving distinct yet essential purposes in managing water in our environments. Sewers, also known as sanitary sewers, are designed for transporting sewage – a mix of waste water from homes, businesses, and industrial sources. This wastewater typically includes everything from household waste, such as toilet flushes and shower water, to industrial effluents. The main goal of a sewer system is to convey this waste to treatment facilities where it can be processed, treated, and eventually discharged safely back into the environment or reused.

In contrast, stormwater drains, also referred to as storm sewers, are designed exclusively for managing rainwater run-off. During periods of rainfall or snowmelt, stormwater drains collect water from streets, rooftops, and other impermeable surfaces and channel it away from urban areas to prevent flooding. This water is often directed to local water bodies like rivers, lakes, or oceans and is typically not treated, which is why managing pollution on surfaces is critical to prevent contaminants from entering these ecosystems.

The key differences between these two systems lie in their purpose and the type of water they handle. Sewer systems focus on sanitation and public health by treating wastewater before releasing it, while stormwater systems are geared towards flood prevention and managing rainwater run-off. Mixing these two systems can lead to environmental hazards, such as the overloading of sewage treatment plants during heavy rains, resulting in the potential release of untreated sewage into the environment. Thus, understanding and maintaining the distinction between these two systems is vital for effective water management and environmental protection.

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What Is Meant By Backflow of Water

What Is Meant By Backflow of Water

How Do You Explain What Backflow Is!

In plumbing the term backflow is used when water flow in the reverse direction. This can lead to severe health risk as the backflow water could contaminate drinking water supplies as well as the foul smells can harm the residents of the home.

What Causes The Water To Backflow?

When there is an unbalance in water pressure between the main and the internal system of the home or business. When the water delivery main has lower water pressure to that of the internal plumbing system then back siphonage occurs. This is also called reverse water flow by some people.

WHAT ARE THE TYPES OF BACKFLOW

There are two types of backflow:

  • Back pressure backflow: this is caused when the downstream pressure is far greater than the upstream pressure (from the public water system). Downstream water pressure is caused by pumps, boiler temperatures. Potable water pressure occurs when the amount of water used exceeds to the supply.
  • Back siphonage: This is caused by negative water pressure (a vacuum or partial vacuum) in public water system. This resembles drinking water through a straw. This normally occurs when water supply is topped when fire fighting or break in the main occurs.

How to stop backflow

Here are 5 ways you can stop backflow:

  1. Air gaps: By installing air gaps you can prevent water flowing back into the dispensing system. These air gaps are normally used in toilets and faucets, separating home supply lines from the sewage lines.
  2. Atmosphere vacuum breakers; Used by home owners who want to install a single backflow to prevent a threat from the public water system. This is cost effective and easily maintained.
  3. Pressure vacuum breakers: This is a more sophisticated version of Atmosphere vacuum breakers. Instead of using air pressure to separate the two systems it generates its own pressure. This is more effective and has wider usage. There is a downside. It needs annual testing which cost money.
  4. Check values: These values come as single and double values for less or more hazardous contamination respectively. These are underground installations. Though these check values are effective they don’t filter out hazardous chemicals. Hence they cant be used in industrial buildings.These also need annual testing.
  5. Reduced pressure principle assemblies: This is the most sophisticated prevention backflow systems available. This makes them available to both home owners and commercial, industrial properties that are exposed to significant water hazards. This system used the 2 check values procedure as well as a depressurized zone that prevents water flow back even if the value fails. This system requires annual testing.

To get effective backflow prevention systems installed on your residential or commercial properties you will need a licensed expert plumber . Call Plumbaround to quote on the job.

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Are you ready for storm season?

Are you ready for storm season?

As we all know in South East Queensland, storm season is fast approaching and if you have ever wondered is there a plumber near me, the answer if YES, Plumbaround!  


We have recently attended a property in North Brisbane where the owner thought the sewerage from the drain was causing a wet patch in the grassed area of their property. 

Upon investigation we found it was a leaking tap that was undetected and was dripping into the down pipes and leaking below the ground into the stormwater line. 

We serviced the tap, cleaned the line, camera’d the line & located the issue. 

The Result …

The stormwater pipe is repaired and is now flowing freely.  The owners will now be ready for storm season & free of a flooding emergency when the rain hits this year.


If you are currently experiencing or previously had overflowing stormwater or sewerage pipe work and flooding on the property and you want to avoid an emergency,

book an inspection with the Plumbaround team today.


Call the team on 07 3038 1038 or email info@plumbaround.com.au

Hydro Jet Rodder drain clearance in Northside Brisbane

Hydro Jet Rodder drain clearance in Northside Brisbane

Jetter The Gap

With the Hydro Jet Rodder on board, Plumbaround can clear even the toughest blocked drains.  Whilst the electric eel is a great machine to clear lines, the Jet Rodder blasts all sorts of debris free from blocked sewer and stormwater lines.

Hydro Jetting cleans drains once cleared of a blockage with a high pressure water jet at up to 35,000kpa. The jet rodder achieves this by feeding a self propelled hose with a specifically designed nozzle up the drain.

There are many places an electric eel cannot go where a jetter hose travels with ease and does the job more effectively and efficiently. We have a variety of nozzles for use and with the ability to pull through toilet pans and tight PVC gully traps.

Hydro-jetting will clear storm water lines blocked by silt, sludge and sediment build up.  The hydro-jet method penetrates the dirt and flushes the drain in one action, leaving the drain clean and free flowing.

Call the Plumbaround team today on 3038-1038 to enquire about the Hydro Jet Rodder.

COVID-19 SAFE

COVID-19 SAFE

At Plumbaround we are committed to ensuring a COVID-19 Safe workplace for our staff & a COVID-19 Safe service for our clients. We have implemented a COVID-19 Safe plan to manage the spread of COVID-19. Queensland’s Roadmap to Easing Restrictions outlines how businesses can operate and at which stage. We have undertaken planning to ensure we keep our business, our staff and our customers safe. We have our Work Health and Safety Plan in place, and keep up to date with strategies to on how to manage COVID-19 in this ever-changing time.

Our staff have undertaken Infection Control Training and COVID-19 Safe training in order for Plumbaround to continue to provide a safe Plumbing & Gas fitting service to our clients. Rest assure we are well equipped with up to date policies and directives from the the World Health Organisation; Queensland Health & the Australian Government.

Our staff and client health & safety is our upmost priority at all times. Remember to regularly wash your hands; use hand sanitiser where possible & practice 1.5m social distancing at all times.